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 Bachelors` Grove Cemetery - an early pioneer cemetery located in SW Chicagoland; designated with burials in the early 1830s; now closed. Located on the edge of the Rubio Woods Forest Preserve, its tombstones are now [2009] covered by weeds, and all is surronded by a chain-link fence.

 Baptist Church - 1937 · bronze plaque commemorating the first permanent meeting place on the southeast corner of Franklin and South Water streets, inscribed: "Chicago`s First Baptist Church - Near this site in the Temple Building, Chicago`s first Baptist church held services. The congregation was organized October 19, 1833 by Rev. Allen B. Freeman. - Erected by Chicago`s Charter Jubilee - Authenticated by Chicago Historical Society." [This bronze plaque could no longer be located by the editors as of 1998.]

 Beaubien Cemetery - 1844 · small private cemetery on land set aside for his family by Mark Beaubien in Lisle, IL, immediately west of 2900 W. Ogden Avenue, not far from his tavern; while the original headstones have disappeared over the years, a new granite marker was erected in 1990, inscribed: "The Beaubien Burial Ground - 1844 - Monique Nadeau Beaubien Wife of Mark Beaubien 1800-1847 - Gen. John Baptiste Beaubien 1787-1864 - Millie Beaubien 1844 - Matilda Beaubien 1846-1848 - Monique Beaubien 1847 - Elinore Beaubien Simmons 1835-1870 - Emily Beaubien LeBeau 1825-1919 - Robert Beaubien 1849-1852 - Jessie Beaubien 1860-1862 - William Brian Beaubien 1844-1845 - Mathias Smith (friend) - Ruby Coté Beaubien 1860 - Elizabeth Bennet Beaubien 1854 - DuPage County Historical Marker Erected 1990." Mark Beaubien`s name does not appear on the marker.

 Beaubien House - 1937 · bronze plaque on the east wall of the Cultural Center, southwest corner of Michigan Avenue and Randolph Street, inscribed: "Jean Baptiste Beaubien - On this site, then the lake shore, Jean Baptiste Beaubien, Chicago`s second civilian, in 1817, built a mansion to which he brought his bride, Josette LaFramboise. It remained their home until 1845. - Erected by Chicago`s Charter Jubilee - Authenticated by Chicago Historical Society - 1937." Beaubien settled permanently in Chicago in 1812, when several houses were already present. The reference to Beaubien as "Chicago`s second civilian" has no historical basis chronologically, but does acknowledge his influence in the community, second only to John Kinzie.

 Beaubien Woods - name given in recognition of the Beaubien family to part of the Calumet Division of the Cook County Forest Preserve District. The woods are located on the Little Calumet River and can be reached from east 130th Street, just west of the Calumet Expressway.

 Beaubien, Alexander - 1907 · son of Jean Baptiste Beaubien; his grave monument is in Graceland Cemetery.

 Beaubien, Jean Baptiste - this bronze plaque, located in Riverside at what is known as the Bourbon Spring, gives no indication when it was cast. It memorializes three separate events, involving General Scott, Jean Baptiste Beaubien, and Daniel Webster. For more background information on Scott and Beaubien, see their entries in the encyclopedic section. The partially eroded text of this weathered plaque reads as follows: "July 1832 - General Winfield Scott camped near this spring on way to Blackhawk War. · June 7, 1834 - Election of Jean Baptiste Beaubien as 1st Colonel of militia of Cook County, known as 60th Illinois Militia. In celebration of the election, kegs of bourbon were poured into spring, giving it name. · 1837 - Daniel Webster arriving from St. Louis was met at this spring by Chicago delegation. Ceremony took place on this spot." Also see "Forbes Residence." [Photograph by Alan Gornik, 2009]

 Beaubien, Josette - 2006 · the plaque here shown was placed behind and above Josette’s grave stone as a supplement and source of information about her life and background. The gravestone can be viewed in the encyclopedic section under LaFramboise, Josette, her maiden name.

 Beaubien, Mark - Lisle Tavern - 1840 · built in the 1830s by William Sweet in Lisle as his residence. Mark acquired the structure in 1840, turned it into a tavern, and from 1851 to 1857, used it as a tollhouse for the Southwest Plank Road. Now the property of the town of Lisle, it was moved a few blocks in 1989 to the Lisle Station Park, where it can be visited; call (708) 968-2747.

 Billy Caldwell`s House - 1937 · bronze plaque on the southeast corner of State Street and Chicago Avenue, inscribed: "Billy Caldwell`s House - Here stood home of Billy Caldwell, half-breed Potawatomi Indian known as Sauganash (The Englishman). It was built in 1828 by U.S. Department of Indian Affairs in recognition of his friendly efforts to preserve peace. - Erected by Chicago`s Charter Jubilee - Authenticated by Chicago Historical Society - 1937." [This bronze plaque could no longer be located by the editors as of 1998.]

 Bison - 1893 · two bronze sculptures of the American buffalo at the east entrance of Humbold Park, near the corner of Division Street and Sacramento Boulevard; originally plaster models on the fairgrounds of the 1893 World Columbian Exposition; cast in 1911 by Jules Berchem. Sculptor: Edward Kemeys. Father Marquette still saw large herds of bison on the banks of the Mississippi in 1673, but by 1830 all native wild bison in Illinois had likely been exterminated.

 Bourbon Spring - bronze plaque atop a square stone foundation, resembling a well, a few yards east of Barry Point Road, Riverside; inscribed: "July 1832 - General Winfield Scott camped near this spring on way to Blackhawk War. - June 7, 1834 - Election of Jean Baptiste Beaubien as 1st colonel of militia of Cook County, known as 60th Illinois Militia. In celebration of the election, kegs of bourbon were poured into spring, giving it name. - 1837 - Daniel Webster arriving from St. Louis was met at this spring by Chicago delegation. Ceremony took place on this spot." [Photograph by Alan Gornik, 2009]

 Bridge - The first bridge built across the main portion of the Chicago River in 1834 was memorialized on one of 16 historical paintings by Lawrence C. Earle, originally located in the banking room of the Central Trust Company of Illinois, 152 Monroe Street, Chicago; now stored within the Collection Services Department at the Chicago History Museum. For another monument to this bridge, and additional information, see entry "Dearborn Street Bridge." [280a]

 

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