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 Gale, Abram - the Abram Gale family grave site is located in [see] Forest Home Cemetery, Forest Park; the Gale family arrived in Chicago in 1835.

 General Winfield Scott - This bronze plaque, located in Riverside at what is known as the Bourbon Spring, gives no indication when it was cast. It memorializes three separate events, involving General Scott, Jean Baptiste Beaubien, and Daniel Webster. For more background information on Scott and Beaubien, see their entries in the Encyclopedia. The partially eroded text of this weathered plaque reads as follows: "July 1832 - General Winfield Scott camped near this spring on way to Blackhawk War. · June 7, 1834 - Election of Jean Baptiste Beaubien as 1st Colonel of militia of Cook County, known as 60th Illinois Militia. In celebration of the election, kegs of bourbon were poured into spring, giving it name. · 1837 - Daniel Webster arriving from St. Louis was met at this spring by Chicago delegation. Ceremony took place on this spot." [Photograph by Alan Gornik, 2009]

 Goodrich, Grant - 1889 · early Chicago lawyer (1834) who eventually became a respected judge, elected to the Illinois Supreme Court; his grave is in Rosehill Cemetery.

 Graue Mill - 1852 · at the corner of York and Spring roads, two blocks north of Ogden Avenue, Hinsdale; the German 1834 immigrant Friedrich Graue built his gristmill in 1852. It was restored in 1950.

 Graves, Dexter - This statue, eight feet tall and known as Eternal Silence, stands in Graceland Cemetery and marks the burial place of the early Chicago hotel owner Dexter Graves (c.1793-April 29, 1845) and his family, who came to Chicago in 1831. The sculpture was created by Lorado Taft in 1909.

 Green Bay Road - 1937 · bronze plaque at the northwest end of Michigan Avenue bridge, inscribed: "Green Bay Road - From this point the Green Bay Road ran northwesterly to Clark Street and North Avenue, and followed Clark Street`s present route to the vicinity of Peterson Avenue. This road connected Fort Dearborn with Fort Howard, Green Bay, Wisconsin. - Erected by Chicago`s Charter Jubilee - Authenticated by Chicago Historical Society - 1937." The road ran mostly on the high ground of one of the ancient ridges created by wave action along the shore of Lake Chicago, a course still evident throughout much of present-day Clark Street.

 Green Tree Tavern - 1937 · bronze plaque on the Butler Brothers Building, southeast corner of Lake and Canal streets, inscribed: "Green Tree Tavern - Built near this site in 1833 and opened by David Clock. Renamed Stage House in 1835, Chicago Hotel a few years later and afterwards Lake Street House. - Erected by Chicago`s Charter Jubilee - Authenticated by Chicago Historical Society - 1937." The tavern was built by Silas B. Cobb for James Kinzie as a two-story frame building and managed initially by David Clock. [This bronze plaque could no longer be located by the editors as of 1998]

 Guardian Angel Mission - 1937 · bronze plaque on the north branch at Foster Avenue bridge, north side, east approach, inscribed: "Guardian Angel Mission - Near this site, from 1696 to 1699, Father Pinet`s Mission of the Guardian Angel from which he conducted his evangelical labors among the Miami. - Erected by Chicago`s Charter Jubilee - Authenticated by Chicago Historical Society - 1937." From 1696 on, the mission was intermittantly occupied, and it was permanently abandoned in 1702 or 1703. The mission`s actual location was most likely the site of the Merchandise Mart; a commemorative plaque once existed on the Builders Building, southwest corner of LaSalle Street and Wacker Drive. [This commemorative plaque, as well as the bronze plaque of 1937, could no longer be located by the editors as of 1998.]

 

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